Chronic Kidney Disease – A plant-based diet prevents and treats CKD

Printable version: Chronic Kidney Disease – full article

Abstract

Interest in the dietary treatment of chronic kidney disease has been growing as its incidence has been increasing. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is now the 8th leading cause of death in the United States and its treatment consumes substantial amounts of medical resources and money.

Several lines of epidemiological research have shown a lower risk of chronic kidney disease among vegetarians. It also shows a substantially increased risk among omnivores, especially those who eat red and processed meats.

Although the practice started long ago, research on the use of a low-protein plant-based diet to treat chronic kidney disease diet has intensified in recent years. This research has shown that a low-protein vegetarian diet is safe and efficacious at both treating and slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease.

Treatment with a low-protein vegetarian diet, often supplemented with keto analogues, has been shown to reduce acidosis, phosphotemia, uremia, proteinuria and to slow progression. Research shows that this treatment does not result in malnutrition. Research has also shown that larger amounts of plant protein than animal protein can be consumed, without deleterious effects.

Treatment with a low protein vegetarian diet also has the advantage of preventing and treating common comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

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A Plant-Based Diet Prevents and Treats Prostate Cancer

This paper has been published in Cancer Therapy & Oncology International Journal.

Citation: Rose S, Strombom A. A Plant-Based Diet Prevents and Treats Prostate Cancer. Canc Therapy & Oncol Int J. 2018; 11(3): 555813. DOI: 10.19080/CTOIJ.2018.11.555813

Abstract

­­This review covers research done on the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer with a plant-based diet. Epidemiological studies have strongly implicated diet as a major modulator of prostate cancer risk. The risk of prostate cancer in vegetarians is less than half that of non-vegetarians. While plant-based foods have been shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer, animal-derived foods increase the risk in a dose dependent manner. Intake of saturated fat and cholesterol found in animal-derived foods are independent risk factors for prostate cancer, contributing further to the higher risk that nonvegetarians have. Continue reading