First Annual Vegfest Medical Seminar

On April 9, 2016, at Seattle’s Vegfest, the first Vegfest Medical Seminar was held for doctors and medical students on the safety and efficacy of a plant-based diet to treat and prevent several common diseases.  This unique event featured 7 different board-certified specialists, who presented the latest research, along with their clinical experience.

We are delighted to announce that a complete set of videos of this seminar are now available.  You can watch the complete playlist of presentations (see video link below program), or select the individual talk topic you are most interested in by clicking on the topic next to each speaker’s name in the program below.

Here is the program for the seminar, with each topic linked to a video of that talk.

7:00pm Welcome Amanda Strombom, President, Vegetarians of Washington
7:05pm Prescribe Vegetarian Campaign Stewart Rose, Vice President, Vegetarians of Washington
7:15pm Cardiology Dr Uma Krishnan, Cardiologist, Cardiac Study Center – Tacoma, WA
7:30pm Endocrinology Dr Mythili Ramachandran, Internal Medicine, Bonney Lake Medical Center, WA
7:45pm Ob/Gyn Dr Esther Park-Hwang, Ob/Gyn, Multicare OB/GYN Associates, Tacoma, WA
8:00pm Oncology Dr Ron Swensen, Gynecological Oncology, Valley Medical Center, Renton, WA
8:15pm Prostate Cancer Dr Andrea Rose, Medical Oncology, Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyallup, WA
8:30pm Infectious Disease Dr Uma Malhotra, Infectious Disease specialist, Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle, WA
8:45pm Preventative Medicine F. Patricia McEachrane-Gross MD, Preventative and Family Medicine, Ocala, FL

 

The Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease with a Plant-Based Diet

This article is also available in printable pdf form coronary-artery-disease-veg-of-wa-9-7-16

Introduction

For over 45 years, evidence from interventional studies has strongly indicated that a low-fat plant-based diet is both safe and efficacious in the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD).  Interventional studies have shown that a low-fat (<10% of calories) plant-based diet is a viable and highly advantageous alternative to other interventional strategies. This treatment can be used in combination with standard treatment regimens, including medication, stenting and CABG.

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A Plant-Based Diet Prevents and Treats Prostate Cancer

This paper has been published in Cancer Therapy & Oncology International Journal.

Citation: Rose S, Strombom A. A Plant-Based Diet Prevents and Treats Prostate Cancer. Canc Therapy & Oncol Int J. 2018; 11(3): 555813. DOI: 10.19080/CTOIJ.2018.11.555813

Abstract

­­This review covers research done on the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer with a plant-based diet. Epidemiological studies have strongly implicated diet as a major modulator of prostate cancer risk. The risk of prostate cancer in vegetarians is less than half that of non-vegetarians. While plant-based foods have been shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer, animal-derived foods increase the risk in a dose dependent manner. Intake of saturated fat and cholesterol found in animal-derived foods are independent risk factors for prostate cancer, contributing further to the higher risk that nonvegetarians have. Continue reading

Vegetarian and Vegan Diets during Pregnancy

Both vegetarian and vegan diets are safe and can meet nutrient requirements with the supplementation of vitamin B12.[i]  According to the Vegetarian Position statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly known as the American Dietetic Association) “Well-designed vegetarian diets, that may include fortified foods or supplements, meet current nutrient recommendations and are appropriate for all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence.”[ii]

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The Superiority of Vegan Diets

A recent European study confirmed the superiority of plant-based or vegan diets. This study used several different indexing systems to rate the healthfulness of a wide spectrum of diets, from vegan to vegetarian, semivegetarian, pesco-vegetarian and omnivorous and concluded that, “the use of indexing systems, estimating the overall diet quality based on different aspects of healthful dietary models  indicated consistently the vegan diet as the most healthy one.”  The study goes on to say that, “the vegan diet received the highest index values and the omnivorous the lowest. Typical aspects of a vegan diet (high fruit and vegetable intake, low sodium intake, and low intake of saturated fat) contributed substantially to the total score, independent of the indexing system used.[i]

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Diverticular Disease risk reduction through diet

By age 60, two-thirds of all Americans will have developed diverticulosis.[i]  Twenty-five percent of patients with diverticulosis will go on to develop acute diverticulitis. This imposes a significant burden on healthcare systems, resulting in greater than 300,000 admissions per year with an estimated annual cost of $3 billion.[ii]

Back in 1979, a research article in the British journal, the Lancet, reported that the prevalence of diverticular disease in vegetarians was almost one third that of meat eaters. It was noted in this study that vegetarians had a mean intake of fiber of 42gm/day vs. 21 gm/day for meat eaters.[iii]

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